Schlagwort-Archive: Dance Fight Love Die

Dance Fight Love Die – Reviews & Statements


DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE  – WITH MIKIS THEODORAKIS ON THE ROAD | REVIEWS & STATEMENTS | SELECTION FROM GERMAN & GREEK PRESS

– BeNow TV: It’s a mighty essay film; a tremendous, hypnotic collage that doesn’t seek out what’s concrete and tangible, but instead aims to penetrate the poetry of Theodorakis’ oeuvre … It is like a notebook, filled by Kutulas with images, thoughts, associations and visions of Theodorakis and his music. The result feels like a cinematic river, frequently turning into a roaring torrent. The movie oscillates between energy and meditation; it possesses a great sense of form, lives off its bold contrasts and juxtapositions, comes with lavish orchestration and almost operatic accents – it is told like a piece of music. 

– Süddeutsche Zeitung: “Dance Fight Love Die“ splices music and moving images into a condensed representation of the life and work of an enfant terrible of recent European musical history: Greek composer Mikis Theodorakis.

– programmkino.de: Kutulas projects a challenging blend of historic document, artful essay and fast-paced onslaught of imagery.

– der Freitag: Theodorakis is always in motion; he connects continents with his appearances. More than once, his larger-than-life persona shines through. 

– junge welt: Kutulas loves ballet, turning this life-in-film into a ballet of many acts. It is more of a dance than a journey through time, as the title itself suggests … Kutulas’ film is far more than a biopic. Through the composer’s music, it tells the history of Greece. Using the life of this musical and physical giant, he describes what it means to be Greek. 

– nachrichten.net: Without any flattery, bells or whistles, Kutulas sends viewers on a voyage of discovery, exploring the universe of a great Greek, Mikis Theodorakis. Employing quickly changing scenes and a completely dialogue-free plot, Kutulas effortlessly bridges the gap between space and time, reality and dream, all overshadowed by Theodorakis’ incredible music … Kutulas’ work is a true cinematic highlight!

– filmjournalisten.de: Like a volcanic eruption, Asteris Kutulas – who also wrote the script together with Ina Kutulas – hurls 30 years of Mikis Theodorakis’ efforts and works onto the silver screen … Like fireworks, one capture after another erupts onto the screen, revealing a bottomless pool of musical ideas that don’t shy away from artistic experiments (Air Brush) and invariably put a spotlight on war, Holocaust, military dictatorship, Greek-Turkish reconciliation and the Cold War. Like eruptions triggered by the clash between universe and humanity’s own destructiveness … The excerpts ejected by this cinematic volcano are sourced from many different parts of the world. In one, several decades after Zorbas, we find Theodorakis dancing the sirtaki with Anthony Quinn on Munich’s King’s Square. In another, he enthuses about Soviet Alpine chocolate, retrieved from a “great cabinet”. And when his hands aren’t busy conjuring up chocolate, they love to direct and compose. This man is a marvel. 

– film-rezensionen.de: „Dance Fight Love Die“ is definitely enthralling – not least of all because of the very different interpretations – but occasionally quite strange and, in its own way, mesmerising. 

– WELT: This is what everything, from left to right, leads to: People will never be the way Mikis Theodorakis, the Marxist methusaleh, shapes them as musical figures. Mikis, the man, extends his arms as if to fly or dance, and states: “I am free”. 

– kino.de: Asteris Kutulas has produced an idiosyncratic portrait of Mikis Theodorakis. The film consists of four- to six-minute clips that come together in a wild trip across four continents. Personal moments receive just as much space as the music of Mikis Theodorakis. This cinematic essay is portrait, historic document and road trip in one. 

– filmdienst.de: You have to let yourself succumb to this patchwork of visual clips and musical maxims. Then, the artistic synthesis of “Dance Fight Love Die” transcends its piecemeal approach and becomes enthralling. 

– indiekino.de: A life in transit, peppered with ever-new encounters. Kutulas lets us participate in this turbulent trip and immense abundance that makes and shapes Theodorakis as a fantastic musician and humorous human with a huge heart. 

– kino-zeit.de: “Dance Fight Love Die“ is a rush of impressions that invites us to delve (even) deeper into Theodorakis and his oeuvre. 

– motzkunst.de: Using poetic and occasionally disturbing visuals for their road movie “from the spirit of music“, Asteris and Ina Kutulas head for a tunnel with the famous Attic light at the end, opening up new cinematic realms. 

– TV TODAY: An unusual mix of collage, essay and portrait of an exceptional artist. 

– Telepolis: Kutulas shows an illustration of the Mauthausen concentration camp, given to him by Simon Wiesenthal, and uses Wiesenthal’s own words to remind us that the Nazis weren’t only reprehensible for their murders, but also because they trampled all over human dignity. In many ways, “Dance Fight Love Die“ is a political film that uses retrospectives to reference current global affairs. 

– koki-es.de: DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE is neither a conventional music documentary nor a traditional biography featuring artist interviews, explanations or a tried-and-tested chronological structure … The film centres around the many – occasionally very personal – moments and scenes of Theodorakis during tours, (private) travels and productions. All recordings portray a highly focused, perfectionist composer in his element who feels music in every vein. 

– spielfilm.de: We’re on the road with the enthusiastic Greek composer – and this continent-hopping tour is often surprisingly funny … an audio-visual, associative journey that uses images and sounds from a 30-year collaboration to capture the man and artist Mikis Theodorakis. 

– Sächsische Zeitung: There are few words in “Dance Fight Love Die“. It is mostly about inspiration, eros and, naturally, one of the most formative composers of a century. 

– hardsensations.com: In “Dance Fight Love Die“ Asteris Kutulas documents the furious productivity of Mikis Theodorakis. He frames Eckermann-esque labours of love in passe-partouts and stages them like a slide show. For thirty years, Kutulas has been collecting private and public slivers of the Greek national hero who doesn’t mind the camera by this side. Theodorakis lives in an incessant creative frenzy.

– Frankenpost: “Dance Fight Love Die“ – the soundtrack of a life … This also turns the film into a soundtrack of 20thcentury Greece and its dark chapters during which Theodorakis fought and suffered – from the Second World War to the civil war and up to the country’s military dictatorship. According to Kutulas, he managed to escape from a death chamber in 1944, but was buried alive during the subsequent civil war in1948 and had to suffer a mock execution by the ruling junta in 1967. For him, death is as much part of life as dancing, fighting and loving. 

– programmkino.de: … Theodorakis is an important symphonic composer; he is a director and choirmaster who delves deep into the respective work and remains skilled at conveying thought-provoking ideas – on love, on death, on fear. Unfettered by dramaturgical structure, this documentary captures his life in a wealth of images and short scenes: Theodorakis and his art graced Athens and Crete as well as the Himalayas and St. Petersburg, Jerusalem as well as the Bavarian town of Passau and San Francisco, South Africa as much as the Turkish cities of Ephesus or Cesme. Naturally, the film also shows his attitude and statements on political issues: on fighting his country’s former German occupation, on the Greek junta and military dictatorship, on their opposition, on the Mauthausen concentration camp (Symphonia Diabolica), on the murdered Anne Frank or the Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal. He loves ballet as much as symphonies, oratorios as much as opera, with its many arias and chorals featured in the film from Medea, Antigone, Elektra or the Mauthausen oratorio. Then, there are lyrics and poems; he talks about war and love; he dreams of the highly problematic Greek-Turkish friendship; he ponders how humanity hurts the Earth. Altogether, an impressive life and, altogether, an impressive film. 

– Griechenlandzeitung: It’s a frequently beguiling rush of music and colours. Not structured chronologically, but associative, not biographical, but experimental, poetic, humorous, existential. It sketches stages of a world-encompassing, unifying music and captures the sheer diversity of a powerful, artistic existence. Theodorakis places the harmony of music and art above the disharmony of humans. “Imagine the Earth without people”, he dreams at once point. And then adds that „humankind is a dischord.“

– Zeitungsgruppe Mittelhessen: The film is a worthy homage to the musician, democrat and humanitarian, without putting him on a pedestal, which wouldn’t suit the musical anarchist anyway. Instead, it offers an associative cinematic collage in the style of Alexander Kluge. Across a range of short clips, young dancers and artists who underscore his work’s relevance to the present, demonstrate just how contemporary Theodorakis music remains, also giving musical room to well-known contemporaries like George Dalaras, Maria Farantouri or Zülfü Livaneli. Plus, naturally, many impressions of the seminal artist himself who remembers early moments stargazing with his father and the loving care of his Turkish mother, but also tongue-in-cheek ruminations about his own cosmos of air, earth, water and universe. 

– unsere zeit: During the ninety minutes of his latest, genre-busting film, “Dance Fight Love Die”, Kutulas meshes very personal moments and historic material, documentary footage and unsettling fiction – in specially produced, epic, feature-style scenes of lovers, pregnancy, in-fighting or demonstrative suicides … Focusing on Theodorakis, who regularly can’t stop himself from singing along while conducting, this travel film collage jumps between the times and locations. The contrasting clips and camera captures follow musical associations on an “echo wall”. 

– ZITTY: What a huge project: Film-maker Asteris Kutulas spent three decades trailing the famous musician, composer and writer Mikis Theodorakis with his camera. From the resulting 600 hours of footage he has now distilled this film. And delivered an extensive portrait of a restless soul. 

evensi.de: The film “Dance Fight Love Die – With Mikis on the Road“ is neither traditional biopic nor concert film, but a visually stunning collage that conveys the art and personality of this important European composer and helps us understand how this passionate, exceptional artist could become the role model for an entire nation. 

– screeneye.gr: … an anarchically structured, but dynamic trip to different destinations where music has the first word in everything Asteris Kutulas and his wife Ina capture. The film features the voices of Mikis and countless young and old artists who cover his songs. In some instances, Kutulas references his own 2015 film, Recycling Medea. There is no logic: Anarchy rules the film’s structure, but this anarchic structure also accounts for this work’s inherent charm.

Elias Malandris (author and theatre critic): … The enchanting female characters in Kutulas work feel like the protagonists of a painting, just like they do in his film “Recycling Medea”. Asteris Kutulas knows Mikis very well and lets us catch glimpses of some the artist’s more personal sides, of his cosmos, of situations with people who are close to him, of his thoughts and ideas – and of disturbing moments in short, very private captures. The film is a precious document of an entire life. 

Ioanna Karatzaferi (author & film scholar): … How did Asteris Kutulas “build” this work? The director made an intelligent decision and assembled the film from 4-6-minute sequences, each of which introduces us to a specific “Theodorakis episode” like a fast-paced timelapse. So, the proceedings are not dominated by the – often witnessed – laboured attempts of a director to equal the portrayed, here Mikis Theodorakis. It doesn’t erect a museum or pedestal, but focuses on the musical action. Overall, the film is impressive in both its artistic and technical execution. Mikis’ and Asteris’ work – they encounter each other and fuse into a hard, indestructable, shining, well-cut diamond. Both Kutulas’ film and his previous film essay, “Recycling Medea”, which revealed his “own Medea”, give me renewed hope for the future of film-making; a hope for films without incessant weapons-waving, films that don’t exclusively focus on horrid crimes, films not dominated by perpetual battle cries or catastrophic invasions … 

– heilewelt blog: I have seen quite a few music documentaries in my life. But I’ve never seen one like DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE about Mikis Theodorakis, a Greek composer. I haven’t known his music beforehand and it’s not a traditional documentary, I feel like I now know what drives Mikis… I found this a very refreshing way of showing a life’s work. Music is emotion and that’s is what the film transports… At some point you get used to the tempo of the film… I highly recommend this movie. You don’t even need to understand Greek or German.

– BeNow TV: “A unique cinematic collage“: This is certainly no film to be expected. Nor a conventional artist portrait … The film doesn’t set out to explain. It is a somewhat enigmatic work – and there’s nothing wrong with that. It even needs to be. In its choice of images, music and montage, the film contains many signs and codes … Its perspective remains mysterious and multi-faceted. Time and again, it throws up new impressions with Theodorakis as the anchoring factor. The rest of the film blurs, fluctuates and keeps surprising us with unusual ideas … Because Kutulas‘ film is less tame-informative documentary and more essay-style exploration of the mythical person of Theodorakis resp. the mythical power of his music … it is a cinematic odyssey. 

– elHype.com: … Although a global name as a composer, Theodorakis also enjoys a fanatical cult following, earning him the stature of a living legend who is still working today into his tenth decade… When one has to account for all the footage they have acquired since 1987, filming the legendary composer travelling and working on tour, condensing all that into less than 90 minutes was not an easy task. However, this is a exactly what director Asteris Kutulas set for himself and the results are the film Dance Fight Love Die – With Mikis on the Road (2017), a record of time the director has spent with Theodorakis on the road from 1987 to the present, organizing more than 150 concerts in 100 locations, in places as diverse and far and wide as Canada, Chile, Russia, Israel, South Africa, Turkey, Australia and most European countries, amounting to over 600 hours of footage… Ultimately, the documentary plays like snippets or teaser trailers cut together. Every inclusion seemed like a dramatic advert for a concert in a particular place at a particular time. Linking all these clips into 87 minutes made for big decisions and attempts at lucid seamlessness…

André Hennicke (actor & author): “Dance Fight Love Die“ – a film like a day dream. Like a breathing memory of a large, adventurous life that doesn’t want to end. The huge, lanky man with a crutch. Who doesn’t want to accept that he can’t fly. He searches for a way to fly anyway. His music. It allows any listener to fly. The many, different shreds of his music that – like fragile filaments – connect those small, human moments with the amazing peaks of his success. Very emotional. Almost as if this was our own memory …

– greeksnewagenda.gr: Filming Greece – “Dance Fight Love Die“: an idiosyncratic portrait of an idiosyncratic artist … Based on over 600 hours of filmed material starring Mikis Theodorakis in any possible situation, “Dance Fight Love Die“ by Asteris Kutulas is a hybrid film on the hybrid life of one of Greece’s most prolific figures, composer Mikis Theodorakis. For thirty years (between 1987 and 2017), Asteris Kutulas organized many major Theodorakis concerts around the world, while he accompanied and occasionally filmed Theodorakis on his travels. This resulted in accumulated film footage of Theodorakis’ travels around the world. Kutulas complemented this material with „fictional“ shootings (filmed by DOP Mike Geranios) adding a subplot inspired by Theodorakis‘ autobiography „The ways of the Archangel“. This docu-fiction film, an experimental portrait of the artist, offers an insight to lesser known aspects of Theodorakis‘ personality, while it cites the universal influence of his music.

Hans-Eckardt Wenzel (songwriter & author): A very impressive film. The ornamental aspect doesn’t get out of hand and the documentary angle adds a sense of soft realism to everything. The film approached Theodorakis’ music in a very astute way while also unleashing its global nature, untethered to the language of words or country norms. The most impressive part was the visual sequence featuring the dancer and Mikis wearing a gas mask at the demonstration. You can feel this sense of justice, this gentle humanism that is sorely lacking in today’s world. The film shows a good way to approach the all-pervading power of music. I can only guess how much work this movie was. Excellent editing, great musical structuring, those breaks between sound and silence, between movement and rigor. I am truly impressed! This film entirely matches my own view and understanding that the only way to escape the current crisis cannot be political, but must be cultural.

Annett Gröschner (author): It’s a collage of staged scenes, backstage video snippets, interviews with Theodorakis and performances around the world. The film also recapitulates the life of the frequently controversial composer who was never just an artist, but always someone who meddled in politics, earning him torture, prison, banishment, exile and, finally – four years ago – an eye injury from a tear gas attack at the Syntagma Square protests. His entire life, Theodorakis was an intellectual free spirit, an autonomous republic in the best sense of the word. Now, at the end of his life, he is forced to state that nothing has improved in Greece, that – after facism, civil war, junta and corrupt neoliberal governments – the climate remains poisoned and the Greeks’ dignity woefully wounded …

Composer’s Statement
 
Asteris Kutulas already revealed to me an independent approach of a most personal point of view in his very first work: the film “Recycling Medea”. For me – looking at it from an artistic point of view – this was a fortunate coincidence. Through his perspective and approach, he introduced completely new ways of expressing and dealing with my own work and my personal life. At first it wasn’t easy for me to adjust to his special approach, because of the vast amounts of work I had already made, as well as the fact that I had been developing my own aesthetic and philosophical codes for a long time. But instead of Asteris’ unusual directorial interpretation of my work and life repulsing me, the opposite happened; they enriched me psychologically, spiritually and creatively because they inspired me to see myself and my work with the fearless eyes of today and tomorrow. I will say, this approach has made me feel young, because this view redeems both my work and me from dozens of years formerly burdened by my untamed life.
 
Mikis Theodorakis, Athens 2018

Photo with Mikis Theodorakis & Asteris Kutulas (1983) © by Rainer Schulz

Dance Fight Love Die – Ein extremer Film (Interview)

INTERVIEW MIT DEM FILMREGISSEUR ASTERIS KUTULAS

Griechenland Aktuell sprach mit Asteris Kutulas, dem Filmregisseur, Übersetzer griechischer Literatur, Gründer der Deutsch-Griechischen Kulturassoziation e.V. und Festivaldirektor des 1. Festivals HELLAS FILMBOX BERLIN, über seinen neuen Film „DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE“, über Mikis Theodorakis und über die Präsenz der Musik von Theodorakis in der Bundesrepublik:

Griechenland Aktuell: Nach „Recycling Medea“ kommt nun ein weiterer Film von Ihnen über das Leben und künstlerische Schaffen des wohl heute bekanntesten Griechen Mikis Theodorakis mit dem markanten Titel „DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE“. Erzählen Sie uns von der Hauptidee Ihres Films.

Asteris Kutulas: In „Recycling Medea“ – meinem ersten Film der „Thanatos Tetralogie“ – steht nicht Mikis Theodorakis im Mittelpunkt des Geschehens, sondern der antike Mythos einer Mutter, die ihre zwei Kinder tötet, um sich an ihrem Mann zu rächen, der erst fremdgegangen ist und sie dann wegen dieser anderen Frau verlassen hat. Theodorakis’ Musik dient sowohl bei diesem als auch bei meinem neuen Film „DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE“ als „Soundtrack“. Und das wird wieder so sein bei „Elektra“ und „Antigone“, den anderen beiden Filmen der Tetralogie, die in den kommenden Jahren entstehen sollen.
Leben und Werkschaffen von Theodorakis ist – auf sehr poetische und eigenwillige Art und Weise – tatsächlich das Thema unseres Films „DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE – With Mikis on the Road“. Ein schnell geschnittenes, rasantes Roadmovie über Musik, Rock’n’Roll, Sehnsucht, Kampf, Träume, Liebe und Tod. Ich wollte mit filmischen Mitteln die Frage beantworten: Was ist Kunst? Und ich wollte einen Film machen, der sich unterscheidet von allem, was ich vorher gesehen hatte.
Einen Film, geboren aus dem Geiste der Musik. Sehr modern und zugleich sehr emotional.

Griechenland Aktuell: In der Filmankündigung heißt es, dass Sie Theodorakis 30 Jahre lang, von 1987 bis 2017, auf vier Kontinenten begleiteten. Bei dem, was Sie an Filmmaterial in Ihrem Archiv haben, handelt es sich um einen riesigen Fundus. Ich kann mir vorstellen, dass es nicht einfach war, daraus ein lebendiges Ganzes entstehen zu lassen, also tatsächlich einen Film von 87 Minuten Länge.

Asteris Kutulas: Das Problem bestand darin, dass die etwa 600 Stunden Material, die ich 30 Jahre lang mit kleinen, unprofessionellen Kameras gedreht hatte, niemals dazu bestimmt waren, zu einem „Film“ zu werden. Darum mussten wir einen Weg finden, dieses Material mit neu gedrehten Szenen zu „kreuzen“, um eine filmästhetisch überzeugende Lösung zu finden. Ich wollte durchaus so etwas wie einen „atemberaubenden Film“ für das Kino schaffen, was uns – meiner Meinung nach – gelungen ist. Auch die allermeisten Publikumsreaktionen bestätigen das. Selbst Menschen, denen der Name Mikis Theodorakis kein Begriff ist und die seine Musik noch nie gehört haben, fühlen sich von dem, was sie sehen und hören, stark angesprochen und mitgenommen auf diese Reise. Eine Bilder-Explosion, ein „Baden“ in Musik und in ganz vielen – konträren – Film-Ideen. Kann man schwer beschreiben, ist was Neues, sollte man sich unbedingt ansehen.

Griechenland Aktuell: „DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE“ kommt ab heute, den 10. Mai, in die deutschen Kinos, was ein großer Erfolg ist. Das hat sicherlich auch mit der Person von Mikis Theodorakis zu tun?

Asteris Kutulas: Theodorakis ist für mich ein „musikalischer Anarchist“, ein moderner Mozart. Er gehört zu den größten Melodikern des 20. Jahrhunderts. Seine Melodien überwinden Sprach- und Ländergrenzen, pflanzen sich fort, als wären sie zeitlos. Sie erreichen Musiker, Sänger, Tänzer, Hörer bis heute. Dieses musikalische Material inspiriert, als wäre es gerade erst geschrieben worden. Das offenbart „DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE“ auf sehr filmische Art und Weise. Ein extremer Film, sowohl hinsichtlich seiner inhaltlichen Konsequenz als auch seiner Form.

Griechenland Aktuell: Es lässt sich annehmen, dass die Musik von Mikis Theodorakis wie auch seine enorme Persönlichkeit in Deutschland nach wie vor bekannt sind. Ist Mikis Theodorakis in der heutigen Bundesrepublik noch immer beliebt?

Asteris Kutulas: Ganz sicher kann man sagen, dass Theodorakis beliebt ist. Er hat anderen nie nach dem Munde geredet und seine Meinung nie hinter der Meinung anderer versteckt. Er war immer sehr eigenständig, unabhängig. So ist auch seine Musik. Dieses Idol, das er bereits vor Jahrzehnten war, ist er für sehr viele Menschen in Deutschland geblieben. Seine Musik, oft tief emotional, schenkt Momente der Erlösung und der Motivation, sie gibt Kraft. Das haben nicht wenige früher erlebt, und um das heute wieder erleben zu können, hört man diese Musik, geht in diese Konzerte. Ich war gerade jetzt, am 4. Mai, bei einer Aufführung seines Werks „Canto General“ im ausverkauften Dresdner Kulturpalast, mit einem völlig enthusiastischen Publikum, der Applaus wollte nicht enden, Chor, Orchester und Solisten hätten noch x Zugaben geben können. Letztes Jahr erlebte ich das bei nach der Aufführung seiner 2. Sinfonie und des „Adagio“ aus der 3. Sinfonie, die von den Düsseldorfer Sinfonikern gespielt wurden. Bei Konzerten seiner „Liturgie Nr. 2“ in Brandenburg und Magdeburg war das zu erleben, und ich erlebe so etwas Ähnliches nach den Vorführungen von „DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE “, wo das Publikum den Theodorakis, den es kennt, teilweise neu entdecken kann. Ich erlebe immer wieder, dass Menschen sich wünschen, diesem Mann wieder begegnen zu können, sich wünschen, dass ihre Kinder und Enkel ihn und seine Musik erleben. Es ist tatsächlich so, als würde man seine Batterien aufladen können, wenn man diese Musik hört. Oftmals erzählt sie von der Sehnsucht des Menschen, ein Tänzer zu sein. Es ist nicht nur ein hoher Beliebtheitsgrad, von dem man sprechen kann, wenn man darüber redet, was für Theodorakis und seine Musik kennzeichnend ist, sondern es ist Dankbarkeit dafür, dass man mit dieser Energie in Kontakt sein kann, dass man bei einer Begegnung zusammen sein kann mit diesem wachen, interessierten Mann, der einem auf den Grund des Herzens schaut und der ein ausgezeichneter Gesprächspartner ist. Er ist ein freier Geist, ein ungewöhnlicher Mensch, und seine Musik ist unikal. Ich erlebe sehr erfolgreiche Musiker und Komponisten, Dirigenten und Chorleiter, die sich vor diesem Werk verneigen. Mir scheint das sogar häufiger geworden zu sein, als es z.B. vor zwanzig Jahren der Fall war. Ich bin absolut sicher, dass Theodorakis’ Musik noch oft neu entdeckt werden wird und Menschen ergreift.

Griechenland Aktuell, 10. Mai 2018
www.graktuell.gr/index.php/articles/kultur-bildung/1620-interview-mit-dem-filmregisseur-asteris-koutoulas

DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE – The Satellite Clips II

 

Dance Fight Love Die – With Mikis on the Road: The Satellite Clips (Trailer)

Two new SATELLITE CLIPS from the „Unused Material“ of the film DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE.

The Satellite Clips: SANDRA
With Sandra von Ruffin by Asteris Kutulas

Mikis Theodorakis‘ Opernmusik „Antigone“ und die Sichtweise des Kameramanns (DOP) Mike Geranios inspirierten Asteris Kutulas zu diesem Satellite Clip, den er seiner Hauptdarstellerin Sandra von Ruffin widmet. Die Vision einer Antigone, deren Aufbegehren vergeblich ist und sinnlos erscheint. Untermalt von einer düsteren Musik, die keine Hoffnung erlaubt.

The Satellite Clips: GEORGE
Filmed by George Theodorakis
With Mikis Theodorakis, Lakis Karnezis, Kostas Papadopoulos a.o. by Asteris Kutulas & Dimitris Argyriou

George Theodorakis filmte im Juli und August 1988 mit einer Video8-Kamera die Premieren-Produktion des „Zorbas-Ballett“ in der Choreographie von Lorca Massine und mit der Musik seines Vaters Mikis Theodorakis. Insgesamt 40 Stunden Videomaterial von Proben, Aufführungen, Backstagemomenten. Asteris Kutulas und Dimitris Argyriou schnitten daraus einen Satellite-Clip zusammen. Zu hören ist ein Ausschnitt aus der wohl berühmtesten Musik von Mikis Theodorakis.

***

SANDRA και GEORGE τιτλοφορούνται τα δύο νέα ανέκδοτα satellite clips που εντάσσονται στο φιλμικό τρίπτυχο του Αστέρη Κούτουλα, με τίτλο «Ταξιδεύοντας με τον Μίκη». Τα «δορυφορικά κλιπ» περιφέρονται γύρω στην κεντρική ταινία «DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE» σαν να είναι ο πλανήτης τους. Φέρουν ως τίτλους τα ονόματα στενών συνεργατών που εργάστηκαν για αυτά, των φίλων και συνοδοιπόρων του δημιουργού στο μακρύ ταξίδι του με τον Μίκη, και είναι αφιερωμένα σε αυτούς.

Το clip SANDRA εμπνεύστηκε ο σκηνοθέτης από μια μουσική φράση της λυρικής τραγωδίας «Αντιγόνη» του Θεοδωράκη και τις εικόνες του οπερατέρ Μηχάλη Γερανιού. Η επανάστασή της Αντιγόνης μάταιη και τραγική. Η μουσική χωρίς καμιά ελπίδα. Η στωική, εικαστική, σχεδόν, οπτασία χρησιμοποιεί την φιγούρα της ηθοποιού Σάντρα φον Ρουφίν. Το γυμνό κορμί, η σωματικότητα σαν σύμβολα με μια στιγμιαία εναλλαγή του προσώπου του Μίκη συνθέτουν 40 δυνατά δευτερόλεπτα.

Το GEORGE είναι φτιαγμένο από υλικό που γύρισε ο γιος του Μίκη Θεοδωράκη, Γιώργος: πρόκειται για λήψεις περίπου 40 ωρών με Video-8 μηχανή τον Ιούλιο και τον Αύγουστο του 1998, οπότε παρουσιάστηκε το «Ζορμπάς Μπαλέτο» σε χορογραφία Λόρκα Μασίν. Πρόβες, παρασκήνια, ανέκδοτες στιγμές από αυτό το μεγάλο γεγονός συνθέτουν το μικρό αυτό κλιπ που κοσμείται από διάσημα μουσικά θέματα του συνθέτη.

Υπεύθυνη Επικοινωνίας και Τύπου
Σοφία Σταυριανίδου, sofia.stavrianidou@gmail.com

***

SATELLITEN UMKREISEN THEODORAKIS’ PLANETEN
Über ein Langzeit-Filmprojekt von Asteris Kutulas
Von Sofia Stavrianidou

30 Jahre. 40 Länder. 4 Kontinente.
600 Stunden Film. 54.000.000 Frames.
Der in Deutschland lebende Publizist, Produzent und Filmemacher Asteris Kutulas hat den griechischen Komponisten Mikis Theodorakis zwischen 1987 und 2017 ungezählte Male besucht; er begleitete Theodorakis auf Tourneen und ließ dabei seine Videokamera laufen. Kutulas filmte Theodorakis bei Konzerten, während diverser Proben mit Orchestern, Solisten, Bands, on Stage und Backstage, bei CD-Aufnahmen in Studios, bei Opern- und Ballett-Produktionen, in Hotellobbys und auf Hotelzimmern, in Bussen und Lokalen, auf Ausflügen und während privater Treffen.
Das zwischen 1987 und 2017 gefilmte Material bildet einen umfangreichen Fundus von etwa 600 Stunden. Aufgenommen wurde es in Berlin, Athen, St. Petersburg, Verona, Santiago de Chile, Sydney, Tel Aviv, Budapest, Wien, Kopenhagen, Malmö, Pretoria, Çeşme, Amsterdam, Montreal, London, Brüssel, Luxemburg, Barcelona, Zürich, Oslo, Paris, auf den griechischen Inseln Chios, Kreta und Syros usw. usf.

SATELLITE CLIPS – Das ungenutzte Filmmaterial (Die Trailer)
Die „Satellite Clips“ umkreisen den Hauptfilm DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE, der ihnen als Heimatplanet gilt. Die Formel lautet: Satellite-Clips = aus dem für den Hauptfilm nicht genutzter 600-Stunden-mit-Mikis-Fundus + Fiction- und Making-of-Material, das während der Shootings mit den Schauspielern und den jungen Musikern zwischen 2014 und 2017 entstanden ist.
Diese Clips, die als Trailer für den Hauptfilm fungieren, werden in den nächsten Monaten bis zur Premiere des Hauptfilms nach und nach im Internet veröffentlicht. Sie tragen den Namen des an der Entstehung des jeweiligen Clips maßgeblich beteiligten Künstlers bzw. Mitarbeiters des Regisseur.

DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE – With Mikis On The Road (Der Film)
Docufiction von Asteris Kutulas – mit Mikis Theodorakis, Sandra von Ruffin, Stathis Papadopoulos und vielen anderen (in Postproduktion, Fertigstellung: voraussichtlich Ende 2017)

Aus dem während dreier Jahrzehnte entstandenen Fundus mit mehr als 600 Stunden unveröffentlichten Film-Materials wird ein 90minütiger hybrider Film-Essay, der den Zuschauer spannende, überraschende, skurrile, mysteriöse, aber auch sehr typische Augenblicke aus dem On-the-Road-Leben eines unverwechselbaren und charismatischen Künstlers miterleben lässt. Augenblicke, die einen umfassenden und originären Einblick in die „Agenda des geistigen Anarchisten“ Theodorakis erlauben. Kutulas verschmilzt in seinem Film sehr persönliche Momente mit historischem Material, dokumentarische Aufnahmen mit humorvoll-grotesker, teilweise verstörender Fiktion, und er macht erlebbar, welchen Widerhall Theodorakis’ Musik in den Arrangements junger Künstler findet – u.a. als Rock-, Klassik-, Electro- oder Rap-Version. Im fiktionalen Parallel-Universum des Films (inspiriert vom autobiographischen Roman des Komponisten „Die Wege des Erzengels“) erscheint die „Liebe“ als Chimäre, der „Tanz“ als Verzweiflungstat, der „Tod“ als Kontrastprogramm, der „Kampf“ als verführerischer Widergänger, der uns immer aufs Neue gegenübertritt und prüft.

Sofia Stavrianidou

DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE – The Satellite Clips

 

Dance Fight Love Die – With Mikis on the Road: The Satellite Clips (Trailer)

The Satellite Clips from the Unused Material of the film DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE.

The Satellite Clips: ASTERIS (Kreuzgymnasium Dresden)
With the classmates of the Kreuzschule by Asteris Kutulas

The Satellite Clips: MAYDAY MIKIS (Dimitris)
With Mikis Theodorakis, Rainer Kirchmann, Maria Farantouri by Dimitris Argyriou

The Satellite Clips: MELENTINI
With Melentini & Mikis Theodorakis by Stella Kalafati

The Satellite Clips: ANNA
With Anna Rezan & Mikis Theodorakis by Dimitris Argyriou & Asteris Kutulas

The Satellite Clips: STELLA
With Stella Kalafati & Mikis Theodorakis by Stella Kalafati

***

SATELLITEN UMKREISEN THEODORAKIS’ PLANETEN
Über ein Langzeit-Filmprojekt von Asteris Kutulas
Von Sofia Stavrianidou

30 Jahre. 40 Länder. 4 Kontinente.
600 Stunden Film. 54.000.000 Frames.
Der in Deutschland lebende Publizist, Produzent und Filmemacher Asteris Kutulas hat den griechischen Komponisten Mikis Theodorakis zwischen 1987 und 2017 ungezählte Male besucht; er begleitete Theodorakis auf Tourneen und ließ dabei seine Videokamera laufen. Kutulas filmte Theodorakis bei Konzerten, während diverser Proben mit Orchestern, Solisten, Bands, on Stage und Backstage, bei CD-Aufnahmen in Studios, bei Opern- und Ballett-Produktionen, in Hotellobbys und auf Hotelzimmern, in Bussen und Lokalen, auf Ausflügen und während privater Treffen.
Das zwischen 1987 und 2017 gefilmte Material bildet einen umfangreichen Fundus von etwa 600 Stunden. Aufgenommen wurde es in Berlin, Athen, St. Petersburg, Verona, Santiago de Chile, Sydney, Tel Aviv, Budapest, Wien, Kopenhagen, Malmö, Pretoria, Çeşme, Amsterdam, Montreal, London, Brüssel, Luxemburg, Barcelona, Zürich, Oslo, Paris, auf den griechischen Inseln Chios, Kreta und Syros usw. usf.

SATELLITE CLIPS – Das ungenutzte Filmmaterial (Die Trailer)
Die „Satellite Clips“ umkreisen den Hauptfilm DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE, der ihnen als Heimatplanet gilt. Die Formel lautet: Satellite-Clips = aus dem für den Hauptfilm nicht genutzter 600-Stunden-mit-Mikis-Fundus + Fiction- und Making-of-Material, das während der Shootings mit den Schauspielern und den jungen Musikern zwischen 2014 und 2017 entstanden ist.
Diese Clips, die als Trailer für den Hauptfilm fungieren, werden in den nächsten Monaten bis zur Premiere des Hauptfilms nach und nach im Internet veröffentlicht. Sie tragen den Namen des an der Entstehung des jeweiligen Clips maßgeblich beteiligten Künstlers bzw. Mitarbeiters des Regisseur. Die ersten beiden „Satellite Clips“ mit dem Titel STELLA und MELENTINI verbinden die „Berliner Ästhetik“ des Regisseurs mit der „Universellen Harmonie“ von Mikis Theodorakis und sind in Zusammenarbeit mit der jungen Filmemacherin Stella Kalafati produziert worden, die während der Entstehung des Hauptfilms als Regieassistentin gearbeitet hat.

DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE – With Mikis On The Road (Der Film)
Docufiction von Asteris Kutulas – mit Mikis Theodorakis, Sandra von Ruffin, Stathis Papadopoulos und vielen anderen (in Postproduktion, Fertigstellung: voraussichtlich Ende 2017)

Aus dem während dreier Jahrzehnte entstandenen Fundus mit mehr als 600 Stunden unveröffentlichten Film-Materials wird ein 90minütiger hybrider Film-Essay, der den Zuschauer spannende, überraschende, skurrile, mysteriöse, aber auch sehr typische Augenblicke aus dem On-the-Road-Leben eines unverwechselbaren und charismatischen Künstlers miterleben lässt. Augenblicke, die einen umfassenden und originären Einblick in die „Agenda des geistigen Anarchisten“ Theodorakis erlauben. Kutulas verschmilzt in seinem Film sehr persönliche Momente mit historischem Material, dokumentarische Aufnahmen mit humorvoll-grotesker, teilweise verstörender Fiktion, und er macht erlebbar, welchen Widerhall Theodorakis’ Musik in den Arrangements junger Künstler findet – u.a. als Rock-, Klassik-, Electro- oder Rap-Version. Im fiktionalen Parallel-Universum des Films (inspiriert vom autobiographischen Roman des Komponisten „Die Wege des Erzengels“) erscheint die „Liebe“ als Chimäre, der „Tanz“ als Verzweiflungstat, der „Tod“ als Kontrastprogramm, der „Kampf“ als verführerischer Widergänger, der uns immer aufs Neue gegenübertritt und prüft.

Sofia Stavrianidou

ΤΑΞΙΔΕΥΟΝΤΑΣ ΜΕ ΤΟΝ ΜΙΚΗ (doctv.gr story)

 
Ταξιδεύοντας με τον Μίκη (Ένα φιλμικό τρίπτυχο του Αστέρη Κούτουλα στο doctv.gr)


Mikis Theodorakis & Asteris Kutulas, Leipzig 1983 (at Moritzbastei) – Photo © by Privatier/Asti Music
 
2.000 ώρες με τον Μίκη (Interview with doctv.gr)

Mikis Theodorakis & Asteris Kutulas, East Berlin 1985 (Rehearsal of „Canto General“) – Photo © by Privatier/Asti Music

 

Athener Tagebuch, 30.7.2015 (Rückflug)

Vierfüßige Schlangen

Während der Pressekonferenz zur Gründung der HELLAS FILMBOX BERLIN fragte gestern im Außenministerium eine junge Journalistin den deutschen Kultur-Presse-Attaché, welchen griechischen Lieblingsfilm er habe. Er antwortet: „My Big Fat Greek Wedding“. Woraufhin der griechische Kulturminister erwiderte: „Im Gegensatz zu unseren deutschen Freunden, die – wie es sich herausstellt – keine griechischen Filme kennen, kenne ich alle Filme von Schlöndorff, Wenders, von Trotta, Herzog, Fassbinder etc. Diese Filme haben mir geholfen, die deutsche Realität und die deutsche Mentalität zu begreifen. Unsere deutschen Freunde jedoch wissen offensichtlich gar nichts über uns … außer einigen touristischen Allgemeinplätzen. Vielleicht hilft die Hellas Filmbox Berlin, dieses griechische Filmfestival in der deutschen Hauptstadt, das zu ändern.“

Jemand erzählte mir im Flugzeug, es habe in der so genannten Urzeit vierfüßige Schlangen gegeben. „Schlangen mit Füßen?“, fragte ich. „Wozu Füße?“ Sie lebten unter der Erde, so die Erklärung, in Höhlen, und gruben sich an die Erdoberfläche vor. Ein grässliches, sechzehnfüßiges Reptil schlief bis eben hinter dem Imithos-Berg. Kavafis hat in seinem Gedicht davon erzählt: Manchmal, alle paar Jahrhunderte, erwacht es und zuckt kurz mit dem Lid, dann schläft es weiter. Diesmal nicht. Diesmal behält es die Augen etwas länger offen, spürt seinen Hunger, richtet sich auf, öffnet seinen Rachen und rollt seine Zungen aus. Es muss kein Feuer speien. Es muss nicht brüllen. Keine Kraftverschwendung. Nur die Zungen ausrollen und sich holen, was zu holen ist. Häuser, Wohnungen, Gärten und was die Menschen sonst noch haben. Die Ersparnisse von den Konten werden langsam abgeräumt. Das Reptil hat keine Eile. In Grenzregionen bringen sie das Geld nach Bulgarien. Den Zungen des Reptils sind Grenzen einerlei.

Morgen werd ich im Babylon stehen und sagen „DANCE FIGHT LOVE DIE – Unterwegs mit Mikis“. Ja, ich will ertrinken in meinen Bildern. Absichtlich. Bevor die Zungen des Reptils uns holen. Aus 39 Grad in Athen stürze ich runter auf 16 Grad in Berlin oder rauf. Je nachdem, wie man das verstehen möchte.

© Asteris Kutulas, 17.7.2015

(Athens Photos © by  Ina Kutulas)